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    The Kardashev Scale – Type I, II, III, IV & V Civilization

    We have reached a turning point in society. According to renowned theoretical physicist Michio Kaku, the next 100 years of science will determine whether we perish or thrive. Will we remain a Type 0 civilization, or will we advance and make our way into the stars? Experts assert that, as a civilization grows larger and […]

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    Scientists Discover Egyptian Secret to Making the Pyramids

    AN ANCIENT MYSTERY Scientists are plagued by a number of questions regarding ancient times, and one of the most perplexing is how the ancient Egyptians moved the huge stones needed to build the pyramids. The stones often weighed as much as 2.5 tons, and without the assistance of modern technology, moving an object of that […]

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    The World’s Largest Underwater Cave Is Already Yielding Sacred Maya Relics

    It’s a place that almost seems too magical to exist: the world’s largest underwater cave, spanning an incredible 347 kilometres (216 miles) of subterranean caverns, discovered in Mexico a month ago. When archaeologists unveiled this immense, immersed labyrinth, they said it wasn’t just a natural wonder, but an important archaeological find set to reveal sunken […]

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    Swarm of Over 200 Earthquakes Detected at Yellowstone Supervolcano

    Regular earthquakes are bad enough. Volcanoes too. But an earthquake swarm at a supervolcano? That really sounds like it could be scary, and scientists say they’ve just detected such a phenomenon at the site of Yellowstone caldera. According to geophysicists with the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the past fortnight has seen Yellowstone supervolcano shaken […]

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    After Two Decades And 6,000 Studies, Scientists Find GMO Corn Is Actually Good For You

    There is a great deal of misinformation out there regarding genetically modified organisms (GMOs). From monikers like “Frankenfoods” to general skepticism, there has been a variety of biased reactions to these organisms, even though we as a species have been genetically modifying our foods in one way or another for approximately 10,000 years. Perhaps some […]

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    Road Trip!: Elon Musk’s Tesla Won’t Strike Earth Anytime Soon

    What’s black and white and red all over—and on a multimillion-year jaunt around the solar system? The answer is Elon Musk’s Tesla Roadster, launched earlier this month as the test payload for SpaceX’s inaugural flight of its Falcon Heavy rocket. Musk is CEO of both companies. The car was originally intended to chase Mars around […]

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    Can Pesticides Affect Pregnancy?

    A new study was released that I know a lot of you are going to be concerned about. It seems that eating fruits and vegetables that are known to have high pesticide residues could make it harder to get pregnant. There’s bound to be a lot of hand-wringing over this in certain corners of the […]

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    The Case for the “Self-Driven Child”

    We are raising the anxious generation, and the conversation about the causes, and the potential cures, has just begun. In The Self-Driven Child, authors William Stixrud and Ned Johnson focus on the ways that children today are being denied a sense of controlling their own lives—doing what they find meaningful, and succeeding, or failing, on […]

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    To Stop Russian Election Meddlers, Facebook Goes Analog

    Now that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has indicted 13 individuals and several groups from Russia for using social media tools like Facebook ads to influence the 2016 Presidential Election, Facebook has responded with a plan to stop such interference from happening again. Ironically, despite the high-tech nature of cyber crime and the constantly-connected world of social […]

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    There Might Soon Be a Drug to Treat Peanut Allergies

    A new treatment to help people with peanut allergies survive accidental exposure just moved one step closer to becoming a reality. Aimmune Therapeutics’s AR101 takes something of a The Princess Bride approach to the problem of peanut allergies. Just like the fictional Westley used repeated exposure to desensitize himself to the poison iocane, AR101 users repeatedly expose […]

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    New atmosphere wind/temperature sensor to improve space weather prediction

    Global wind and temperature measurements in the lower thermosphere (100-150 km above Earth) are the two most important variables needed to accurately predict space weather and climate change. An innovative technique is being developed jointly by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, GSFC, and JPL to make these measurements using the atomic oxygen emission […]

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    Co-evolution black hole mystery deepened by a new ALMA observation

    Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to observe an active galaxy with a strong ionized gas outflow from the galactic center, a team led by Dr. Yoshiki Toba of the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA, Taiwan) has obtained a result making astronomers even more puzzled—the team clearly detected carbon monoxide (CO) […]

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    Frontiers Partners with Figshare to Promote Open Data

    Read the news on the Figshare blog. Ahead of Open Data Day, Figshare is pleased to announce their partnership with Frontiers, a leading Open Science platform. This broadens the types of supplementary data that can be included with Frontiers articles and enhances the visualization, discoverability, citation and sharing of research data outputs. The new service […]

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    Team publishes roadmap to enhance radioresistance for space colonization

    An international team of researchers from NASA Ames Research Center, Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate at Health Canada, Oxford University, Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Insilico Medicine, the Biogerontology Research Center, Boston University, Johns Hopkins University, University of Lethbridge, Ghent University, Center for Healthy Aging and many others have published a roadmap […]

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    Russia and China Are Working on Space and Counterspace Weapons

    Every year, the Department of National Intelligence (DNI) releases its Worldwide Threat Assessment of the US Intelligence Community. This annual report contains the intelligence community’s assessment of potential threats to US national security and makes recommendations accordingly. In recent years, these threats have included the development and proliferation of weapons, regional wars, economic trends, terrorism, cyberterrorism, […]

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    Losing Biodiversity Could Lead to “Extinction Cascades”

    Domino Effect Human expansion, destruction of natural habitats, pollution, and climate change have all led to biodiversity levels that are considered below the “safe” threshold for global ecosystems. And the consequences of biodiversity loss aren’t just about the extinction of certain charismatic species. A new study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy […]

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    NASA Budget Proposal Would Cancel WFIRST

    The recent budget proposal for NASA dealt a blow to the astronomical community, putting several key missions — including WFIRST, a successor to Hubble — under the financial axe. The post NASA Budget Proposal Would Cancel WFIRST appeared first on Sky & Telescope. Source: skyandtelescope

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    NASA May Stop Trying to Understand Dark Energy

    First To Fall In recent weeks we’ve heard how the Trump administration’s proposed NASA budget might affect the future of the agency’s projects. The International Space Station could be eyeing its last seven years in service; its funding will likely not be extended beyond the mid-2020s. Now, another NASA initiative is on the chopping block. The new […]

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    MVPs at the Pyeongchang Games: Robots

    The city of Pyeongchang, South Korea has seen the arrival of the 2018 Winter Olympics, and the thousands, if not millions of attendees, Yet humans haven’t been the only ones walking around. Alongside them (and the norovirus) were more than a few robots as well. As reported by NPR, these Olympic robots came in all […]

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    After Two Decades, Scientists Find GMOs in Corn Are Good for You. Seriously.

    GMO Corn There is a great deal of misinformation out there regarding genetically modified organisms (GMOs). From monikers like “Frankenfoods” to general skepticism, there has been a variety of biased reactions to these organisms, even though we as a species have been genetically modifying our foods in one way or another for approximately 10,000 years. […]

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    Pulsating aurora mysteries uncovered with help from NASA's THEMIS mission

    Sometimes on a dark night near the poles, the sky pulses a diffuse glow of green, purple and red. Unlike the long, shimmering veils of typical auroral displays, these pulsating auroras are much dimmer and less common. While scientists have long known auroras to be associated with solar activity, the precise mechanism of pulsating auroras […]

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    Falcon Heavy Could Make Asteroid Mining a Reality

    Space Miners SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy could facilitate a 21st century Gold Rush of sorts, only instead of heading west, these miners would search for valuable minerals and chemicals in space. Click to View Full Infographic Our solar system is filled with millions of asteroids, rocky worlds ranging in size from just a few feet across to […]

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    Refurbished Organs Could Save Millions on the Transplant List

    Organ transplantation is a miracle of modern medicine, but it has a pipeline problem: roughly 20 people die every day while waiting for an organ transplant. Scientists at Harvard Medical School think they may be able to solve that problem by sprucing up old organs from pigs and animals, giving the organs and their new […]

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    We’re Getting Closer to Vaccines to Combat Drug Addiction

    In the United States, 115 people die as the result of an opioid drug overdose every day. This statistic, gathered as part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) work to understand and combat the current epidemic of opioid drug abuse in America is even more startling when you compare it to figures […]

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    Cyber Warfare Is Growing. We Need Rules to Protect Ourselves.

    An Urgent Call Cyber warfare is as real as it gets; the flurry of cyber attacks that made headlines and disrupted industries in 2017 alone attests to that. If it was up to United Nations (U.N.) Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, the globe would already have international rules to minimize damage to civilians from cyber attacks, or to […]

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    Nebula Genomics Will Let You Rent out Your Genetic Information

    Sequencing Subscription When the human genome was sequenced for the first time in 2001, the project cost $1 billion, as per a report from Nature – but today, individuals can undergo the same process for around $1,000, and prices are set to drop even further. Nebula Genomics, a start-up co-founded by genetic sequencing pioneer George […]

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    Astronomers Observe the Rotating Accretion Disk Around the Supermassive Black Hole in M77

    During the 1970s, scientists confirmed that radio emissions coming from the center of our galaxy were due to the presence of a Supermassive Black Hole (SMBH). Located about 26,000 light-years from Earth between the Sagittarius and Scorpius constellation, this feature came to be known as Sagittarius A*. Since that time, astronomers have come to understand […]

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    Musk’s Boring Company Is Pushing Forward With East Coast Hyperloop

    East Coast Hyperloop We’re one step closer to an East Coast hyperloop now that Elon Musk’s Boring Company has secured both a preliminary permit and a location for initial excavation: 53 New York Avenue NE in Washington D.C. The permit, which was issued on November 29, according to The Washington Post, allows for hyperloop preparation […]

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    The Discovery of Gravitational Waves Marks the Start of a New Era in Astronomy

    Eugenio Coccia, one of the scientists who have confirmed the existence of gravitational waves, talked to Sputnik about his research and the work of the international scientific community. Italian professor Eugenio Coccia — president of the Gran Sasso Science Institute and founder of the institute’s Center for Advanced Studies — is also a member of […]

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    Huge black holes spotted expanding ‘faster than their own galaxies’

    Huge black holes, billions of times heavier than our sun, are expanding faster than their host galaxies can grow stars, NASA has revealed. So are they about to eat the universe? Well, not quite: instead, it throws lights on how galaxies grow, where we previously believed that huge black holes always grew ‘in tandem’ with […]

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    China Claims They Have Actually Created an EM Drive

    GUESS WHO’S BACK After a relatively long news hiatus, the impossible EM (Electromagnetic) Drive is making a comeback. Researchers from China’s space agency have released a video through state media earlier this month showing a supposedly-functional EM Drive. Have the Chinese finally made the impossible happen? Let’s not be quick to jump to conclusions here, […]

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    Data detectives shift suspicions in Alzheimer’s to inside villain

    The mass pursuit of a conspicuous suspect in Alzheimer’s disease may have encumbered research success for decades. Now, a new data analysis that has untangled evidence amassed in years of Alzheimer’s studies encourages researchers to refocus their investigations. Heaps of plaque formed from amyloid-beta that accumulate in afflicted brains are what stick out under the […]

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    Google AI can predict heart disease by looking at pictures of the retina

    I can look into your eyes to see straight to your heart. It may sound like a sappy sentiment from a Hallmark card. Essentially though, that’s what researchers at Google did in applying artificial intelligence to predict something deadly serious: the likelihood that a patient will suffer a heart attack or stroke. The researchers made […]

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    Plants colonized the Earth 100 million years earlier than previously thought

    For the first four billion years of Earth’s history, our planet’s continents would have been devoid of all life except microbes. All of this changed with the origin of land plants from their pond scum relatives, greening the continents and creating habitats that animals would later invade. The timing of this episode has previously relied […]

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    Unconventional superconductor may be used to create quantum computers of the future

    After an intensive period of analyses the research team led by Professor Floriana Lombardi, Chalmers University of Technology, was able to establish that they had probably succeeded in creating a topological superconductor. Credit: Johan Bodell/Chalmers University of Technology With their insensitivity to decoherence, Majorana particles could become stable building blocks of quantum computers. The problem […]

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    A Mysterious Radioactive Particle Has Been Detected Above Alaska

    The team was on a routine pollution-sampling flight from Anchorage to Hawaii when they discovered it by chance, floating alone in the evening Alaskan sky. At an altitude of about 7  kilometres (4.3 miles) above Alaska’s Aleutian Islands, it was unlike anything the researchers had seen in two decades of air sampling: a single radioactive […]

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    Ancient Roman “Gate to Hell” Killed Victims With This Deadly Lake

    A cave ancient Romans believed to be a gate to the underworld was so deadly that it killed all animals who entered its proximity, while not harming the human priests who led them. Now scientists believe they have figured out why – a concentrated cloud of carbon dioxide that suffocated those who breathed it. Dating […]

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    As Drones Become Tools of War, Companies Turn to Hacking Them

    It’s no surprise that drones are being used as tools of war. They’re designed to go places too dangerous or risky for humans. They drop bombs; they surveil secure locations. But perhaps it’s more surprising that the drones themselves are becoming the plane on which conflicts play out. As drones accomplish increasingly sophisticated tasks, more […]

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    Astronomers reveal secrets of most distant supernova ever detected

    An international team of astronomers, including Professor Bob Nichol from the University of Portsmouth, has confirmed the discovery of the most distant supernova ever detected – a huge cosmic explosion that took place 10.5 billion years ago, or three-quarters the age of the Universe itself. The exploding star, named DES16C2nm, was detected by the Dark […]

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    James Webb Space Telescope to reveal secrets of the Red Planet

    The planet Mars has fascinated scientists for over a century. Today, it is a frigid desert world with a carbon dioxide atmosphere 100 times thinner than Earth’s. But evidence suggests that in the early history of our solar system, Mars had an ocean’s worth of water. NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope will study Mars to […]

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    The Tesla Model X: Canada’s Future Police Recruit

    Canada’s Ontario Provincial Police offered up a glimpse of the future of policing at this year’s edition of the Canadian International Autoshow: a Tesla Model X P90D outfitted for use as a pursuit vehicle. The SUV was given a black-and-white paint job, the OPP badge, and a working siren, but for the time being it’s […]

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    Ensuring fresh air for all

    A start-up company from an ESA business incubator is offering affordable air-quality monitors for homes, schools and businesses using technology it developed for the International Space Station. Source: phys.org

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    Comet Watch – Work experience students spy on comets using GOTO

    Article Written by Gavin Ramsay Comets have been known for millennia with Halley’s Comet famously being shown in the Bayeux Tapestry illustrating events which took place in 1066. They were also thought to foretell catastrophic events. Today we know them as having a small nucleus made up of ice and dust and when they near […]

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    Lyman-alpha emission detected around quasar J1605-0112

    Using the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) instrument astronomers have discovered an extended and broad Lyman-alpha emission in the form of a nebula around the quasar J1605-0112. The finding is reported February 9 in a paper published on the arXiv pre-print repository. Source: phys.org

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    'Ultramassive' black holes discovered in far-off galaxies

    Thanks to data collected by NASA’s Chandra X-ray telescope on galaxies up to 3.5 billion light years away from Earth, an international team of astrophysicists has detected what are likely to be the most massive black holes ever discovered in the universe. The team’s calculations showed that these ultramassive black holes are growing faster than […]

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    Jellyfish Chips Are the Future of Junk Food

    Jellyfish are not exactly the centerpiece of most people’s ideal meals. The umbrella-shaped animals are slimy, tasteless, and can be extremely poisonous. But a population boom and the need to reduce meat — and other foods that require extensive energy to produce — consumption, means humanity has to get creative when it comes to making […]

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    Dystopian Robot Tailor Makes Terrible Shirts

    A Tailored Task Machine learning and artificial intelligence have been used for several exciting tasks in recent years, including helping fight against mental illness, discovering new exoplanets, and teaching AI systems new languages. There’s one task that AI hasn’t mastered: making clothing. It probably seems a little mundane compared to exploring the universe, but for most […]

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    Dystopian Robot Tailor Makes Terrible Shirts

    A Tailored Task Machine learning and artificial intelligence have been used for several exciting tasks in recent years, including helping fight against mental illness, discovering new exoplanets, and teaching AI systems new languages. There’s one task that AI hasn’t mastered: making clothing. It probably seems a little mundane compared to exploring the universe, but for most […]

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    Opportunity Just Saw its 5,000th Sunrise on Mars

    It’s been a time of milestones for Mars rovers lately! Last month (on January 26th, 2018), NASA announced that the Curiosity rover had spent a total of 2,000 days on Mars, which works out to 5 years, 5 months and 21 days. This was especially impressive considering that the rover was only intended to function […]

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    Some of the Ozone Layer Is Still Thinning, Thanks to a Surprise Chemical

    If you grew up in the 70s or 80s, you probably heard a lot of talk about cholorofluorocarbons, AKA CFCs — chemicals used in aerosol sprays and refrigerants. That’s when we first figured out that CFCs could harm the ozone layer of our atmosphere. Suddenly, overly-hairsprayed styles from the 1980s seemed much less cool. Then in 1987, […]

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    Subscribe to Our New Weekly Email Newsletter Written By Fraser

    It’s been almost 19 years since I founded Universe Today, back in March, 1999. Back when I started, it was a primarily an email-based newsletter with an archive version on the web where people could read it if they wanted to. The technology was pretty rudimentary at the time, so I had to do everything […]

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    An Algorithm Knows When Your Kid Is Using Your Phone

    Next Level Parenting Shiny screens have a way of appeasing wailing children far more effectively than the old jingling keys standby. However, 21st century parents have to weigh the benefits of near-instant placidity with the very real possibility that their toddler could unknowingly max out the AmEx buying gummy bears on Amazon. Thankfully, new software developed […]

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    Oh, Great: There’s Lots of Mercury in the Thawing Permafrost

    Climate change is responsible for altering sea turtles’ genders, acidifying our lakes, and pushing clouds away from tropical forests. In the future we’ll also have to deal with rising temperatures, extreme weather, and massive flooding. Climate change is also responsible for melting permafrost, the frozen soil found in colder regions around the globe. When that frozen […]

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    Neptune’s Huge Storm Is Shrinking Away In New Images From Hubble

    Back in the late 1980’s, Voyager 2 was the first spacecraft to capture images of the giant storms in Neptune’s atmosphere. Before then, little was known about the deep winds cycling through Neptune’s atmosphere. But Hubble has been turning its sharp eye towards Neptune over the years to study these storms, and over the past […]

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    Scientists Use Graphene to Create Edible Electronics

    James Tour believes anything can be turned into graphene — well, anything with the right carbon content, that is. For the past few years, the Rice University chemist’s lab has investigated new and innovative ways to use graphene, a so-called “miracle material,” and for their latest research, they developed a method of imprinting graphene patterns […]

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    New Nanobots Kill Cancerous Tumors by Cutting off Their Blood Supply

    Tiny Bots, Big Potential In a major breakthrough for the field of nanomedicine, researchers have developed tiny autonomous robots that can shrink cancer tumors by cutting off their blood supply. Using a technique known as DNA origami, scientists from Arizona State University (ASU) and China’s National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (NCNST) programmed tiny robots to […]

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    Carnival of Space #549

    Welcome to the 549th Carnival of Space! The Carnival is a community of space science and astronomy writers and bloggers, who submit their best work each week for your benefit. So now, on to this week’s stories! First up, over at the Chandra X Ray Observatory Blog, they have two articles about the The Billion-year […]

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    The Ultimate Tornado Close Up – Must Watch Video

    Dodge City Tornado. This took place on May 24, 2016. This violent, long track tornado packed EF3 tornado force winds over open Kansas country southwest of Dodge City. Source The post The Ultimate Tornado Close Up – Must Watch Video appeared first on Science Vibe. Source: sciencevibe

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    Top 15 NASA Inventions As a Result of Apollo 11

    Did you know that more than 6300 technologies as a direct result of NASA scientist developing Apollo 11? Here are the top 15 NASA inventions that are used day to day. 1. CAT scanner: this cancer-detecting technology was first used to find imperfections in space components. 2. Computer microchip: modern microchips descend from integrated circuits […]

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    It’s Great That Supermarkets Are Cutting Plastic Waste. But That’s Not Going to Solve the Problem.

    Things that belong in the ocean: sharks, coral reefs, mermaids (well, they would if they were real, anyway). Things that don’t belong in the ocean: milk jugs, water bottles, plastic bags. And yet we’re headed toward a future where our oceans contain more plastic than fish. If she actually existed, Ariel would be so disappointed in us. […]

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    Are Supermassive Black Holes Going to Eat the Universe?

    The largest black holes grow faster than their galaxies, according to new research. Two studies from separate groups of researchers find that so-called supermassive black holes are bigger than astronomers would have calculated from their surroundings alone. Supermassive black holes are enormous gravity wells found in the center of large galaxies. No stress, though: The […]

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    Scientists Just Made Sheep-Human Hybrids. Here’s What You Need to Know

    Researchers have achieved a new kind of chimeric first, producing sheep-human hybrid embryos that could one day represent the future of organ donation – by using body parts grown inside unnatural, engineered animals. With that end goal in mind, scientists have created the first interspecies sheep-human chimera, introducing human stem cells into sheep embryos, resulting […]

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    This “Smart Drug” Could Hack Your Brain Chemistry to Increase Your Intelligence

    THE SCIENCE OF NOOTROPICS Nootropics, broadly speaking, are substances that can safely enhance cognitive performance. They’re a group of (as yet unclassified) research chemicals, over-the-counter supplements, and a few prescription drugs, taken in various combinations—that are neither addictive nor harmful, and don’t come laden down with side-effects—that are basically meant to improve your brain’s ability […]

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    Elon Musk: Flying Cars Are Definitely Not the Future of Transport

    NOT A SCALABLE SOLUTION As far as the future of our roadways is concerned, the Tesla and SpaceX CEO isn’t placing his bets on flying cars. For someone who’s into bold and disruptive technology, Elon Musk’s stance on flying cars appears to be a contradiction — more so since his proposed solution to congested traffic […]

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    Running helps the brain counteract negative effect of stress, study finds

    Most people agree that getting a little exercise helps when dealing with stress. A new BYU study discovers exercise—particularly running—while under stress also helps protect your memory. The study, newly published in the journal of Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, finds that running mitigates the negative impacts chronic stress has on the hippocampus, the part […]

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    This Photo of a Single Trapped Atom Is Absolutely Breathtaking

    At the very centre of the image above is something incredible – a single, positively-charged strontium atom, suspended in motion by electric fields. Not only is this an incredibly rare sight, it’s also difficult to wrap your head around the fact that this tiny point of blue light is a building block of matter. Tiny […]

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    Where in Space Is Elon Musk’s Roadster Right Now?

    It’s been barely two weeks since SpaceX successfully launched the first Falcon Heavy into orbit, and many are curious as to where it and its unconventional passenger are right now. Instead of sending something boring as the Heavy’s first payload, SpaceX CEO and founder Elon Musk launched his own Tesla Roadster. On board is a […]

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    Do Money, Social Status Woes Fuel the U.S. Gun Culture?

    The U.S. has more guns per person than any other country, a ranking that is unlikely to drop even in the wake of the latest high-casualty mass shootings. Why are guns so pervasive here when they take so many lives (more than 36,000 in 2015)? Which Americans are the most strongly tied to their guns—and […]

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    Soon You’ll be Able to Dance, Clap, and Tap to Charge Your Devices

    Picture the scene: a few years from now, your phone runs out of battery. Instead of scrambling for a charger, you clap your hands and watch it spring back into life. Sound far-fetched? It’s not, thanks to a new technology developed by researchers at Clemson’s Nanomaterials Institute (CNI). In March 2017, the team put together […]

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    Chemicals Like Perfume Produce as Much Air Pollution as Cars

    Contributing Emissions When we think of air pollution, we likely think of vehicle emissions and their significant contribution to global climate change. However, in a recent study led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), scientists found that the top contributor to urban air pollution is actually a close race between vehicle emissions and […]

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    Image: Saturn's B ring peaks

    While the Winter Olympics is in full swing in PyeongChang, South Korea, and many winter sport fanatics head to snow-clad mountains to get their thrills on the slopes this ski-season, this dramatic mountain scene is somewhat off-piste – in Saturn’s rings to be precise. Source: phys.org

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    Astrophotographer captures Musk's Tesla Roadster moving through space

    An astrophotographer in California has captured images of Elon Musk’s Tesla Roadster on its journey around our sun. In the early morning of February 9th, Rogelio Bernal Andreo captured images of the Roadster as it appeared just above the horizon. To get the images, Andreo made use of an impressive arsenal of technological tools. Source: […]

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    Brilliant Ideas That Buy Us Time Before Cape Town Reaches Day Zero

    In just over 100 days, researchers expect Cape Town to run out of water. The South African megacity has traditionally enjoyed abundant rains during winter and a warm, pleasant climate during summer, but after three years of drought, experts now expect the city’s water system to collapse on June 4, 2018. Currently, Cape Town’s citizens […]